I Couldn’t Help Myself

This past Sunday, Michael and I arrived at church a little early.  While we were waiting for others to get there, some of the kids came running in and said, “Ms. Katy, there’s a dog outside!”

Now, if you’ve known me for a hot minute, you would know I have a few passions in life, and one of the big ones is those of the canine persuasion.  When I’m not pregnant, I volunteer with the SPCA of Dallas, and I am a pet sitter.  I love working with dogs who are undersocialized, and dog behavior and rehabilitation are my niches.  But I am also the one that will go after a stray or a lost dog in the neighborhood without another thought.

So when I heard there was a dog outside, my first instinct was to investigate.  I mean, like, leaving my purse in the chair and walked straight to the door.  And then I heard a voice behind me,

“Katy, wait.  I’m coming with you.  Do not handle that dog.”

That would be my husband, who knows that when a dog is in need of help, I can sometimes forget myself.  So, we went outside, where one of our other adult friends was holding this beautiful Rotty mix by the collar.


The dog was calm, friendly, and curious.  He knew how to sit and give a high five.  His coat was shiny.  He looked well fed.  His nails were cared for.  This was a loved dog, and I knew someone was definitely missing him.

So what do you do when you find a lost dog?

First of all, no child should approach a loose dog.  This is something to instill in every. single. child.  Do not go up to a dog, not even if they seem friendly and relaxed.  Don’t run after a dog either.  Don’t whistle or call out.  In a calm voice, while bending down low, call out to them.  If you have treats, throw them out in front of you, far away from you and then close to you.  If the dog doesn’t seem interested, then call animal control.  Do not try to wrangle or trap the dog.  It’s best if you have some type of slip lead with you or rope that you can tie to their collar.

Handling dogs can be dangerous, especially when you don’t know their background if they are good with kids, men, or other animals.  I just want to stress again that if you are in any doubt, that you just call animal services.  I know “dog catchers” get a bad reputation, but they are well trained, and the ones I’ve met just want the dogs to be reunited with their families as much as we do.

Since this dog was pretty calm, and easy to handle (by my husband and our friend, not me) my first instinct was to find a local Vet ER to find out if the dog has a microchip.  Usually, they are open on the weekends and have a scanner.   It turned out that he did have one!  I cannot stress enough how important it is to microchip your dog.  It’s not very expensive, and for our dog, it’s twenty dollars a year to maintain.  Because this dog was microchipped, they were able to contact the owner and leave my name and number (with my permission, of course).

We waited at the building for a while, hoping to get a callback but unfortunately, we couldn’t stay there.

So if you can’t hold onto the dog, what do you do?

The best place to take them is actually the local humane shelter or animal services.  They can keep the dog there until they are picked up by the owner.  We ended up taking the dog (whose name was Zeus) to the Dallas Animal Services.  They took my information, checked over the dog, and that was it.

About an hour or two later, I did get a call from the owner.  Apparently, they are staying with family while construction is being done on their house.  This is a prime situation for a dog to get loose and lost – being in an unfamiliar environment.  This happens a lot during moves as well.  Luckily, I told them where he was, and that he was waiting for them to pick him up.  It was a wonderfully happy ending!




Happy Birthday, Teddy!

So, if you follow me on Instagram, you know that we celebrated our pup’s birthday on Monday.  He has been a part of our family for almost a year, and it has been so wonderful to watch him grow and learn.20180205_084531.jpg

We adopted Teddy from the SPCA.  He was in a group of dogs who came from a hoarding situation, meaning that the owner had too many dogs to be able to care for all of them.  He was unsure of a lot of human social interaction but was very comfortable around other dogs.  He knows the rules of play with dogs, but the rules when interacting with humans were completely foreign.

Over the last year, he has learned so much.  We have game nights at our house that are so helpful with Teddy meeting and interacting with new people.  He has learned, for the most part, to calm down when coming in from outside.  I mean, he’s still only two and a puppy for the most part.

For our dogs’ birthdays, we have a tradition of taking them to Petco (not sponsored) and letting them walk around the store.  They get to sniff all the toys and go home with a toy and treat.  This was the first time Michael and I can remember actually taking Teddy to a store like this, so I was interested to see how this would play out.


He was a bit unsure, with his tail tucked and his back legs shaking.  There were so many sights and smells and sounds.  We decided to take him closer to the end of the day when the store wouldn’t be as crowded.  I think the experience overwhelmed him at first, but gradually he seemed to adjust.


We walked around the store a few times.  But my favorite part was when two of the employees got down to approach him.  He went right up to them and let them pet him.  It was an amazing moment, that I, of course, forgot to take a picture because I was part of the interaction.  I wanted to be in the moment for him in case he was unsure.  But he was actually braver during those interactions than he was just walking through the store, itself!

Later this month, he will go to the vet for the second time since he has been a part of our family so he will have more opportunities to interact in unfamiliar settings.  I’m so proud of our pup, and I look forward to seeing how much he will grow and learn this year!


In Other News (Dog Edition)

I thought I would share stuff going on with the pups lately since it’s been mostly about the pregnancy in my life right now (of course, I put a lot of pup pics on Instagram so they aren’t totally being left out online).


Jerzee hates the cold, or she just loves snuggling that much.  On especially cold days, I will put a sweater on her.  I find that when I do that, she is more likely to go outside more and spend less time under a blanket.  Still, she is adorable.


She still likes to be in the center of everything, though.  Whether that’s sitting on someone’s lap or doing tricks in the middle of a room of people.  In the above picture, she actually got into Michael’s lap because I was paying attention to Teddy.  Jealousy runs deep with this little one.


And while Jerzee was in Michael’s lap, this is ultimately what Teddy ended up doing.  He doesn’t quite get the skill of snuggling, but he has grown by leaps and bounds since he first became a part of our family.  He understands now that humans are awesome for scratches and pets, and he will even approach humans now (mostly looking for attention or treats).  As a once hoarded dog, this makes me smile big.


Of course, he’s not without some quirks and kinks to work out.  He has a thing for licking and chewing on blankets, especially if we are not in the room.  I tend to find the holes, still slobbery after they have been made.  We had to make a decision that he’s not allowed on the couch anymore until we know he has grown out of this habit (since our couch is also fabric, I don’t want to take any chances).  But it’s pretty pitiful to see him longing to jump up on the couch.  He will sit as close as he can to it, or rest his head on it.  We set up a dog bed for him right next to us, and that seems to suffice…for now.

I love my two pups and all their quirky ways.  I am looking forward to seeing how they will react to a new baby, though I’m not worried about it at all.  It will definitely be an adjustment, but I can’t wait to introduce my love for canines with my kid!


Closing Up Shop (Temporarily)

If you have read my blog for any amount of time, you would know that my life is pretty much all about dogs.  I volunteer with the SPCA, have two dogs of my own, and I pet-sit.  It’s that last one that I want to talk about today.


I am the luckiest girl in the world to have the clients that I do.  These humans and their canine counterparts are some of the greatest friends.  They have prayed for us, hugged our necks, and cared for us through all of our pregnancy losses.


The holiday season is a busy season for the pet-sitting world, and I’m sad to say that I won’t be participating this year, even though it’s for the best reason ever.  This was a really hard decision to make, even harder than the one to step down from volunteering at the SPCA.  But I’m really thankful that my clients understand.


Of course, I fully plan to start pet-sitting again after the baby is born and we get all settled in, but that won’t be until next year.  So, until then, I will miss all my canine friends and hope they all have a wonderful and safe holiday season!


Even More Dog Tricks


So, on my blog, I have shown you what my dog, Jerzee can do.  And I thought it was about time to show you what Teddy has been working on.  So, here’s the latest trick Teddy can do!


A Word of Advice about Canines and Cars

As you know, I love dogs.  They have been in my life for as long as I can remember.  I volunteer with the SPCA as both an adoption counselor (bringing dogs and their families together) and a behavior foster (rehabilitating dogs for their future homes).  I also have two dogs of my own, Teddy that we adopted recently and Jerzee, my canine bestie.


Jerzee has seen me through so much.  My engagement, wedding, moving to Dallas, and she’s been by my side through every pregnancy loss.  When I used to work from home, one day a week we would go on errands.  Checking mail.  Picking up lunch.  And when I would arrive at the post office, I would leave her in the car for a quick in and out.

That’s right.  The dog lover would leave her dog in the car.

I didn’t realize the danger that this would be.  And the trips were usually under 5 minutes.  I never did it when it was triple digits outside.  And I usually parked in the shade.  But once I realized how dangerous this could be, I started doing these trips alone.  I never take my dog out with me unless I know I can take her into the store.

I have started to notice a lot of information being shared about this hot topic (pun definitely intended).  I recently saw this video about how hot it can get in your car.

If that doesn’t convince you, there is this great infographic from Global Tint UK Global Tint UK that really summarizes everything.  Even if you see a dog in a parked car and what to do.

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I used to do this.  I know how fun it is to have your canine bestie riding shotgun as you run errands or take long commutes.  But the risk is not worth it to leave them in that car.  I know better now, so I do better now.  Please share with your friends, family and any other dog lovers you know!


Teddy’s First Visit to the Vet

We adopted Teddy in February from the SPCA.  He was still under vet care at the SPCA for the first couple of months after his adoption.  But we knew we would eventually want him to go to our favorite vet at the Chase Oaks Animal Clinic in Plano, TX.  Dr. Sanders has taken care of our pups since we first moved here, and we love all of the staff there.


Jerzee is not so much a fan.  Granted, the majority of her visits involve someone sticking her with a needle.  I don’t blame her.  But she is a good sport, though she does end up being in Michael’s arms by the end of the check up.

Ted was unsure but warmed up as soon as the treats came out.   The vet loved him. He is quite the handsome dog.  And it helped that his check up didn’t involve any needles or anything invasive.  His opinion may change when it comes time to update his vaccinations.

We’ve tried a few other pet clinics here in Dallas, but we always seem to come back here. The important factors of a vet clinic to us are how willing they are to explain any procedure or diagnosis, how patient and calm they are with our dogs, how familiar they are with our dogs (especially after seeing Jerzee for years) and how knowledgeable they are with the latest pet care trends (whether they really are helpful or not). This post isn’t sponsored by them, I just like them that much.  It’s our little pet family, and I would recommend them to anyone!